Stand With Ukraine

We Stand With Ukraine

It can be overwhelming to keep up with everything going on, so here is a list of what you can do and the power you have.

Staying informed responsibly

Staying informed is the best way to know what’s going on and what you may need to do next. However, with a lot of propaganda going around, make sure to check your sources and where you are taking in media. Make sure to keep your own mental health in check and take breaks from the media.

Donate

Donating is an excellent way to get necessary resources to any corner of the world. While it is tempting to donate to any cause that sounds legitimate, make sure you do your research to see where that money is actually going. Below is a list of places we have found that are legitimate.

It is important to remember to support local organizations providing aid to displaced people in and coming to Saskatoon. Displaced people face many challenges when coming to Canada. Support local organizations providing community housing, food, and language courses.

Volunteer

Volunteering makes us feel more connected to our local communities, as well as communities around the world. It doesn’t have to be directly connected the ongoing crisis in Ukraine to be helpful. By unraveling one thread at a time, you can take down the whole tapestry of corruption, hate, and destruction.

Attend Rallies and Events

Attending rallies and events that support Ukraine and Ukrainian Organizations helps us reconnect with the community and our roots. Whether you’re Ukrainian or not, it can help you feel united. It is important to make sure to think of your comforts and boundaries when attending these events. With the country opening up it can create some situations that are uncomfortable. Please respect your communities boundaries and wishes, whether they decide to wear a mask or not. Kindness is needed in times of uncertainty.

Talk to your local and federal Government representatives

There is so much value in emailing your MP. It is difficult for them to represent their constituents in parliament if they don’t know how they are feeling and thinking. Letters and emails are valuable as part of a larger campaign where they can help to gain momentum behind a specific issue. If many MPs raise the same issue with the government, its significance and importance will grow.

It doesn’t really make much difference whether your MP sits on the government or the opposition benches, in fact, cross-party campaigns and issues can hold much more weight.

You don’t have to keep it to just your local MP, you can write to any government representative voicing your concerns or calls to do more.

You can find your local MP here:
https://www.ourcommons.ca/members/en/search?province=SK

Take care of your community

Whether Ukrainian or not, many people are hurting and suffering with the weight of these times and events. It is important to remember that while your health and wellbeing is important, we need to lift each other up when we can, as we grow and thrive better as a collective.

When our Ukrainian ancestors first came to Canada they relied heavily on the good will of their communities to survive. Our communities have grown since then, both in diversity and numbers, so we need to continue that spirit and take care of our community members.

  • Talking or visiting family members or loved ones
  • Ask Ukrainian neighbours and friends what you can do to help them, or better yet, listening can be the most amazing tool to ease thoughts.
  • Random acts of kindness
  • Make artwork and crafts and hang them in the front windows for people to see when they walk by
  • Baking treats for a care home (call before as COVID restrictions may have changed acceptance of meals and gifts)
  • Join an Adopt a Senior program
  • Donate Toys to Ronald McDonald House (call before as COVID restrictions may have changed acceptance gifts)
  • Shoveling or scraping someone’s sidewalk
  • Plan a sledding or skating day with your kids and kids in the area
  • Visit businesses and museums you’ve never been to before
  • Share small business’ social media posts
  • ETC

Temporary Hours

Monday: Closed
Tuesday: Closed
Wednesday: 10 AM – 4:30 PM
Thursday: 10 AM – 4:30 PM
Friday: 10 AM – 4:30 PM
Weekends: Closed

The museum will be keeping all Covid-19 protocols until further notice. All guests and staff must wear a mask and practice social distancing when possible.

Get In Touch

910 Spadina Crescent East,
Saskatoon, SK
S7K 3H5
306.244.3800
ukrmuse@sasktel.net

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